WUI in the News

Here you can find current news articles about wildland-urban interface issues in the U.S. and abroad. Please note that while Interface South maintains news archives for reference, the links may no longer be active. You may need to contact the source or host website for more information.

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Aug 2004 contains 10 News Articles.

Toxins Accumulate in Arctic Peoples, Animals, Study Says
National Geographic News - 27 Aug 2004
Various studies in recent decades have found that animals from polar bears to killer whales, not to mention native peoples like the Eskimos, or Inuit, carry unusually high levels of human-made chemicals in their bodies. The chemicals reach the Arctic borne north by wind and ocean currents.

Toxin warnings grow for U.S. fish
CNN.com - 25 Aug 2004
One of every three lakes in the United States, and nearly one-quarter of the nation's rivers contain enough pollution that people should limit or avoid eating fish caught there.

Bear Drinks 36 Beers, Passes Out
San Francisco Gate, CA - 19 Aug 2004
When state Fish and Wildlife agents recently found a black bear passed out on the lawn of Baker Lake Resort, there were some clues scattered nearby -- dozens of empty cans of Rainier Beer.

Alaska locals want a sliver of the forest
Christian Science Monitor - 5 Aug 2004
The residents of Gustavus, AK are among a growing number of conservationists advocating for "micrologging," or small-scale timbering, as an ecologically sound alternative to clear-cutting and constructing more logging roads at taxpayer expense. Richard Haynes, a Forest Service economist, says Alaskans, strangely, are plagued by a timber shortage, even though the American market is glutted with cheap wood coming from Canada and pine forests in the Southeastern US.

Why Boston's plants bloom earlier now than 100 years ago
Christian Science Monitor - 2 Aug 2004
Dr. Primack and his research team found that plants at Harvard University's Arnold Arboretum in Boston are flowering eight days earlier on average than they did 100 years ago. This change in flowering time parallels closely the rise in Boston's temperature - 1.5 degrees Celsius - over the same time period.

Scientists Call for a New Vision of Wildfire Preparation
U.S. Newswire - 2 Aug 2004
At the annual meeting of the Society for Conservation Biology in New York City, five prominent scientists released a set of principles for wildlands fire management that synthesize new scientific knowledge on the subject. The scientists are calling for approaches that focus on long- term restoration of the integrity of forests and rangelands, and prepare for wildlands fire using targeted risk reduction measures. The new vision for fire preparation recommends actions in three land management zones.

Weathering wildfires
CNN - 2 Aug 2004
Fires have served Mother Nature dutifully for millennia, shaping the landscape, revitalizing forests and grasslands, clearing out underbrush and weeding out weak trees. But Americans have traditionally viewed such blazes as a menace, prompting strict suppression policies.

Scientists Call for a New Vision of Wildfire Preparation
US Newswire - 2 Aug 2004
At the annual meeting of the Society for Conservation Biology in New York City, five prominent scientists released a set of principles for wildlands fire management that synthesize new scientific knowledge on the subject.

Raccoons go where others fear to tread -- and set up camp
The Boston Globe, MA - 1 Aug 2004
As attacks on humans by cougars and coyotes become regular fare on the evening news, it is apparent that problems with urban wildlife are increasing. Of all the large animal invaders, however, it is the raccoon that is colonizing man's habitat as well as any. Whip-smart, nearly as skillful with his hands as a safecracker, and curious to the point of walking right into your house, the raccoon is surviving and thriving where others struggle.

Developments continue to threaten area's water quality
Bonita News, FL - 1 Aug 2004
With the cries of ospreys masked only by the sounds of construction equipment, the setting is typical for Southwest Florida as more of the region's watershed is converted from rural, mostly natural land to large residential communities, retail strips and mega-malls. What was a rural area with a relatively small source of stormwater pollution is becoming one of the bay's largest contributors of excess nutrients and other impurities.